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BSc (Hons) Psychology with Neuroscience

Middlesex University

Our course combines broad theoretical skills of modern psychology practice with a focus on the neuroscientific explanations and research of human behaviour.

You’ll study in the psychology department which has some of the most high-tech equipment available. In our sector-leading laboratory, you’ll have access to all the facilities you would imagine from a top class lab – psychophysiological monitoring, electroencephalography (EEG), and more. Even in eventualities where we are unable to be in the laboratory or classroom together, we aim to use virtual tools to help you develop key practical skills.

The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and you’ll have access to membership once you graduate with your psychology and neuroscience degree, providing you gain a 2:2 award or above.

After graduation, you can choose to progress into postgraduate training or pursue a career in law, politics or teaching. Previous graduates have gone on to work with companies like Pro Star Academy, Royal Free Hospital, and more.

Throughout your degree you’ll study the foundations of psychology and neuroscience, broadening your understanding and knowledge of the disciplines. You’ll learn by researching, analysing and processing complex data and real-life case studies.

Designed to give you a deep understanding of psychology, this course sets you up perfectly for further postgraduate training. It also teaches you transferable skills required for a career across a wide range of industries.

During the course you’ll also have the option to undertake a work placement so you can test the skills you've built up throughout your modules. This year long placement sets you up to succeed when you go on to your postgraduate career. A wide range of influential and established organisations are involved with the placement course, for example Great Ormond Hospital School, St Georges Hospital, Priory Hospital, Institute of Psychiatry, Institute of Education, University College London, Holloway Prison, and the Metropolitan Police.

We are regularly reviewing and updating our programmes to ensure you have the best learning experience. We are taking what we have learnt during the pandemic and enhancing our teaching methods with new and innovative ways of learning.

We aim to model a wide range of teaching strategies and approaches on the course which you can adapt to your own setting.

We are regularly reviewing and updating our programmes to ensure you have the best learning experience. We are taking what we've learnt during the pandemic and enhancing our teaching methods with new and innovative ways of learning. Please regularly check this section of the course page for updates.

You will attend lectures, workshops and practical classes, where you will explore ideas through class discussions, work on written assignments and give presentations. You will supplement all this with your own independent research, supported by outstanding learning resources available to all students. In your final year you get to undertake a dissertation that is based on a research project that you design and carry out.

We have extensive laboratory facilities, including computer equipped research labs, a psychophysiology lab, a social observation lab, an auditory cognition lab and ten testing and interview rooms. Even in eventualities where we are unable to be in the laboratory or classroom together, we aim to use virtual tools to help you develop key practical skills.

Work Experience

You will have the option to undertake an expenses-based work placement during your studies as a year- long assignment between year two and three. Depending on the organisation you are on placement with, you may be entitled to apply for a maintenance grant. The year-long work placement exempts you from paying tuition fees for the full academic year; ensuring you gain the necessary practical skills to embark on your chosen career.

A wide range of influential and established organisations offer placements to Psychology students, for example Great Ormond Hospital School, St Georges Hospital, Priory Hospital, Institute of Psychiatry, Institute of Education, MIND, NHS, and Victim Support.

Previous placement students have been engaged in a wide range of clinical and educational research, for example eating disorders, obsessive compulsive disorders, autism and stuttering, and investigating the psychological factors in relation to sexual assault. The availability of placements is subject to the co-operating organisation. We also offer support to help you acquire the employment skills you need to undertake placement.

Placements and internships greatly improve graduate employment prospects, and those who take part achieve excellent academic results through applying their learning in a professional setting. Our specialist Employability Service and London location ensure that every year our students and graduates gain prestigious placement opportunities.

Find out more about the Psychology Work Placements Scheme.

You will be assessed through a mixture of exams and coursework, including your dissertation, essays and practical reports.

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory practicals, workshops, and tutorials. Lectures allow you to gain and develop knowledge in specific subjects. You can discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures and practicals in smaller seminar groups usually made up of 20 students. In addition, you can arrange one to one sessions with your personal tutor or module leader. You will also have access to and use resources to support your learning including; specialist software and dedicated laboratories throughout your course.

During your first year (level 4), your weekly timetable will typically consist of:

When not attending your teaching, sessions mentioned above, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on projects, undertaking research, and preparing for assessments including coursework, presentations and examinations. Your independent learning is supported by the facilities available including the library and Study Hub, Laptop hire, and with online materials in MyUniHub (see student support section below).

Your overall workload will include the activities listed above, and with each credit being completed equating to 10 hours of study time (You will complete 120 credits per level of study, which are broken down into modules of typically 30 credits). While your actual hours may depend on the optional module that you choose (if available), the following information will give you an indication of how much time is allocated to teaching and independent study on your course:

Level 4

22% of your time is spent in timetabled Teaching and learning - typical structure activity:

Level 5

23% of your time is spent in timetabled Teaching and learning - typical structure activity:

Level 6

17% of your time is spent in timetabled Teaching and learning - typical structure activity:

We’ve made changes to how we assess our courses due to the restrictions which were in place during the pandemic. We’re reviewing what aspects of these changes to take forwards into 2021/22 and you’ll be provided information on this by your academic department.

The course will provide you with opportunities to test your knowledge and understanding informally through ‘formative’ assessment. This will be completed before your formal ‘summative’ assessment which will count towards your final marks. Each module normally contains at least one piece of formative assessment from which you will receive feedback from your tutor. Formative assessments are developmental and any grade you receive from formative assessment does not count towards your final marks.

There is formal ‘summative’ assessment as part of the module, usually towards the end of the module. Assessment methods could include written examinations, a range of coursework including essays, laboratory reports, portfolios, and your main final year project. The grades from the summative assessments count towards your module mark. Assessments are reviewed annually and may be updated based on student feedback, to suit content or based on feedback from an external examiner.

The balance of assessment will depend on the modules that you complete throughout your course. The approximate percentage of the course which is assessed by coursework is outlined below:

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Requirements

Listed below are the documents required to apply for this course.
3 years

Duration

Sep 2024

Start Month

Aug 2024

Application Deadline

Upcoming Intakes

  • September 2024
  • September 2025

Mode of Study

  • Full Time