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6 MBA courses in Ireland for international students

Sean Campbell
Last Updated: 17 July 2021 • 6 min read

If you want to rise to the top of the business world, studying an MBA (Master’s in Business Administration) is a pretty good way to start. 

Need some proof? Here’s an article we wrote on the highest paying Master’s degrees where, lo and behold, the MBA comes out on top. 

A quick glance through the qualifications of top CEOs around the world shows the power of the MBA too, with many big business names holding this degree. Being who we are, we wrote about that too! Check out these 7 Fortune 500 CEOs with an MBA

As for studying MBA courses in Ireland, we couldn’t recommend it enough! Surprise, surprise, we’ve got an article which you should definitely read on the top reasons to study abroad in Ireland. But here’s enough to know for now: It’s a business hub with lots of employment opportunities, and the educational standard is world class. 

There is also an abundance of MBA courses in Ireland, with accreditations from the likes of EQUIS, AMBA, and / or AACSB (the three largest business school accreditation organisations). 

Here, we'll take a look at 5 of Ireland’s best universities to study an MBA. 

5 MBA courses in Ireland for international students

  1. Trinity College, Dublin
  2. University College, Cork
  3. University College Dublin
  4. Dublin Business School
  5. University of Limerick
  6. Queen’s University, Belfast

1. Trinity College, Dublin

One of Europe’s most prestigious old universities, Trinity College offers one of the most popular MBA courses in Ireland. Students can study the Trinity MBA as a full time, one year course, or as a part time, two year Executive MBA. 

Trinity Business School is the number one business school in Ireland, and is ranked in the top 20 in the whole of Europe. The MBA course’s focus on project based and “live-action” learning is what sets it apart. You’ll work as part of a group of students with senior management teams in three separate Company Projects, solving real-life business issues. 

If that’s not enough practical learning for you, the TCD business school also grants the opportunity to travel to Belgium, Brazil or South Africa for a week-long study residency. 

2. University College, Cork

A part time, two year Executive MBA course, designed for already employed professionals, the UCC course focuses on turning professionals into innovators and leaders. 

It does this by taking students beyond their own fields of expertise or experience, to gain a more complete understanding of the concepts and mechanics of business organisations. Areas of study include decision making & strategy, operations management, HR, financial analysis, business innovation, sustainability, and leadership development. 

But alongside this, the UCC MBA focuses on understanding how all these facets work together in the “bigger picture” of a large, complex business. By learning about and appreciating this bigger picture, students develop their ability to apply their skills in a strategically effective way across a much broader range of industries. 

3. University College, Dublin

UCD is Ireland’s biggest university, and the Smurfit Business School therein is ranked in Europe’s top 25 business schools. The “Smurfit MBA” carries the most accreditations of any of the top MBA colleges in Ireland—with endorsements from EQUIS, AMBA, and AACSB. 

In fact, it’s the only Irish business school with this triple accreditation— an honour afforded to only 1% of business schools worldwide. 

There are plenty of modules on the core principles of business administration, from finance to strategy, leadership to HR. But the UCD MBA’s standout quality is the special attention it pays to global business issues, with modules on global & corporate strategy, as well as an International Consulting Project. 

During this project, you’ll work with an overseas based company and provide a live consultation in a tight timeframe. 

The international, globally-minded approach of this course is reflected in the make-up of the classroom, 65% of which is made up of international students on average.

4. Dublin Business School

Dublin Business School courses have been growing in repute for a number of years now, and it’s now considered one of Ireland’s leading independent colleges. As its name suggests, DBS’ education is focused specifically on the student’s career growth. 

The MBA at DBS can be done full time over one year, or over two years with part time attendance. But one thing that really stands out about this MBA is the diversity of choice students have:

You can elect to complete the standard MBA which sets you up for business management across a range of industries. Alternatively, students can choose more specialist MBAs in Cloud Computing, Human Resources Management (HRM), Finance, Information Systems, Marketing, and Project Management. 

5. University of Limerick

“Developing leaders for uncertain times,” reads the banner on the website of UL’s Kemmy Business School. This is an indication that the faculty understands how the business world is ever changing, and right now is facing its biggest challenge in a long time. 

The Kemmy Business School comes with a fantastic reputation. It’s ranked in the top 2% of business schools globally, and is both AMBA and AACSB accredited. 

As for the course, its unique selling point is the flexible schedule. Lasting two years, students attend for three days at a time every month (for eight months). This leaves working professionals much more free to continue with their careers, and also allows for family commitments to remain as undisturbed as possible.

The course content itself allows students to choose specialized modules that match your desired career path, alongside the core modules which focus heavily on internationalization. 

This emphasis on internationalization is reflected in the annual online “International Workshop”. Taking part in this series of conferences, students can listen to business leaders and entrepreneurs all around the globe, and gain fresh perspectives about doing business in new cultures. 

6. Queen’s University, Belfast*

*Belfast is the odd city out here. You see, it’s in Northern Ireland, which is in the UK, but it’s also in Ireland… OK a quick explainer: 

Ireland is an island with two countries—The Republic of Ireland (which most of us call ‘Ireland’ for ease), and Northern Ireland, which is still a part of the UK, just like Scotland and Wales.

But there’s no border and you’re free to come and go between the North and the Republic as you wish, but do know that if you study at Queen’s University, Belfast, you’ll need a UK study visa!

It’s a bit confusing I know (and I’m from there!), but we’ll explain in more detail in another article. 

But enough about politics and geography, what about the Queen’s MBA? Well first off, QUB is a Russell Group University (the UK’s Ivy League equivalent), so it’s got a fine reputation. The MBA itself employs an innovative style of “integrated teaching”, meaning that it doesn’t simply offer a range of standalone modules. Rather, it progresses through a series of developmental “mindsets”, via which academic topics are integrated through experience. 

As well as the core study areas of strategy, leadership, finance, accounting etc, students can also elect to study areas more specialized to their industry or career ambitions, by taking a deeper look at areas like Business Analytics, Business Planning, and Social Innovation. 

And finally, the Queen’s MBA course has the added bonus of career development opportunities, featuring one-on-one coaching sessions, interview skills training and CV analysis to help boost your immediate work prospects.  

So you’re thinking about studying abroad? You’re in the right place! Edvoy can help you explore and enrol on a fantastic course at one of the world’s best universities. Click here to get started, or follow the button below! 

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Sean Campbell
Written By
Sean Campbell

Sean is a writer, copywriter & editor from Ireland.

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